Lost links & Re-ups

On any post, if the link is no longer good, leave a comment if you want the music re-uploaded. As long as I still have the file, or the record, cd, or cassette to re-rip, I will gladly accommodate in a timely manner all such requests.

Slinging tuneage like some fried or otherwise soused short-order cook

08 August 2013

Laos




This is a collection of landmark recordings by Laurent Jeanneau documenting music created by various musicians of the Harak, Heuny, Nkriang, & Brao ethnic groups in Southern Laos. These ethnic groups exist near the bottom of the global socio-economic hierarchy (Laos is considered one of the world's least developed countries). 


This music represents the roots of Molam music which is now a popular music style in Laos & Thailand. The music is played on the khaen (ແຄນ), a mouth organ of Lao origin whose pipes, which are usually made of bamboo, are connected with a small, hollowed-out hardwood reservoir into which air is blown, creating a sound similar to that of the violin. This is combined with sung poetry in the vocal styles from this region, gong ensembles, various stringed instruments, cymbals, & drums, all captured live on location with the ambient sounds of the surrounding villages.


These recordings were made in Xekong, Champasak, & Attapeu provinces. This is probably the first time recordings have ever been released of indigenous music from
these remote areas of Southern Laos.

 Various – Ethnic Minority Music of Southern Laos, Sublime Frequencies SF036, 2007. 
decryption code in comments

Tracklist –

Molam
Khen le Molam
Khen
Gaw Gawng Jing Pe Play
Gaw Ja Galpeu
Thalong Tha Ka-Nying
Reum Bang
Ding Boo
Jing Riang Me Lun
Gaw Mat
Jing Riang
Npo It Npo It Janeel Goor
Mpo It Npo It A We Mawn Siang Grai Jeu Leuay
Gaw Joor Nyet
Gaw Gawng Jing Pe Play
Jeu Phawn Peng Gawng Ploung Ken
Boyt Tawng

Enjoy, 

5 comments:

  1. XD-iB0EbQN1kSy1Bs5vKQwixDEY3W856B_RChZ70pJ4

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  2. Really nice work recently in some countries where recordings are surely sparse.

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    1. Thanks, brother. The last few I've had to rely on Sublime & Sir Alan kinda heavily. I had Radio Phnom Pehn from SF in my Cambodia files, but think I've found some other really interesting sounds, so I'll slack off my Frequencies dependency for a little, at least.

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  3. it s always embarrassing that someone i don t know just take my recordings to put on his blog, if u were doing something that shows your knowledge rather than your ignorance, i would not mind. but u ve used 2 photos from the north, a village in the north and a HMONG khene player from the north, u are misleading the listener, cause the mouthorgan of the Hmong man is 6 bambootubes, and the mouthorgans that can be heard on the SF cd are 14 bamboo tubes...music from the very south indeed

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    1. Thank you for your comment & the information you have provided. The post was about the entire country of Laos, so I don't really see the problem with showing photos from the northern part of Laos. I don't know how you are saying I took your recordings, as I simply posted up a Sublime Frequencies release. I made no claims about the 6 versus 14 tube mouthorgan. The music on the CD was simply mu sic from southern Laos. I know that there are political & ethnic disagreements & prejudices between different group in Laos, but that should not stop folks from around the globe from enjoying a sampling of the countries musical styles. The CD I used was the only music I had from Laos. Sorry it didn't meet with your approval.
      your ignorant blogger,
      Nathan

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